Wilderness Emergency Medicine ECS | Between a Rock and a Hard Place

March 09, 2020
Hiking to Valley Anchorage in Santa Cruz Island, where students encountered a ro
Disclaimer: The photos below are part of mock scenarios for students to earn their Wilderness First Responder certification.

We calmly strolled down the Santa Cruz Island coast line towards Valley Anchorage, when suddenly we came across a scenario of three fallen rock climbers strewn in front of us. Screaming, shouting, and rolling around in the jagged crevice as we approached and took charge of the situation in front of us, practicing the skills we have learned in previous days. Today, we learned how to react and support poison emergencies, seizures, diabetic emergencies, and the suggested questions to ask patience when confronted with a medical emergency.

We also did another round robin of scenarios for primary and secondary assessment practice. These skills can be applied in all sorts of ways throughout our life, and then the scenario with the hikers forced us all to call upon our knowledge and maintain our composure. We realize how serious and critical situations like these are. To add to the chaotic scenarios, four girls “slipped” in the showers and needed emergency medical care in the evening. We were able to practice our triage and assessment skills again today. We also learned the value of leadership when working with a triage scenario.

CSS students are so enthusiastic that we asked for even more night scenarios to practice our newly acquired medical skills and knowledge. As we look forward, we hope to gain Wilderness First Responder certification and advance our newly acquired knowledge. Hopefully, not in real life though!

Hayden H. '20 was a “patient” of the rock climbing scenario, and several student

Bijan S. '20 was another “patient," and student rescuers had to find a way to re

Click here to view all of the 2020 ECS blogs.

Hiking to Valley Anchorage in Santa Cruz Island, where students encountered a ro
Hayden H. '20 was a “patient” of the rock climbing scenario, and several student
Bijan S. '20 was another “patient," and student rescuers had to find a way to re