Wilderness Emergency Medicine ECS | Our First Scenario

March 05, 2020

Students learn to immobilize a possible lower leg fracture.

As the cacophony of screams pierced our ears, we began our next step into rescuing. We assessed the problem and begin our procedures. With our primary assessment we ruled out the immediate threats. We checked for any deformities, head trauma, and airway obstructions. Our secondary assessment helped us get a better understanding of the scenario. As we checked the patient’s vitals, we found the details of the problem. Later, we put our new skills to the test when we were walking to the waterfall called La Cascada. We applied our knowledge of splint-making to stabilize the patient’s injured limbs. We also learned how to do a multiple-person safe carry technique to move a patient to a safer location. Back at the field station, we learned how to properly perform CPR on a life-sized dummy. Overall, our first full day of Wilderness First Responder (WFR) class taught us the basics of becoming WFR certified.

Students at Las Cascadas taking a quick break before their next segment of class

Students learning BEAM (Body Elevation and Movement) to move multiple people or

Students learn to immobilize a possible lower leg fracture.
Students at Las Cascadas taking a quick break before their next segment of class
Students learning BEAM (Body Elevation and Movement) to move multiple people or